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Creating A Section 508 Accessible Site

If you are a web developer by profession, you should be educated about Section 508 Standards. Such standards aid website developers in making sites accessible for all; primarily for disabled users, visually or auditory impaired. 

In fact, as per federal regulations, government websites should comply with the guidelines as outlined by Section 508. With the heavy reliance we place on the internet for learning, employment, healthcare, social networking, research, and more, it is crucial for sites to be accessible for all. You can also visit this website to know more about 508 compliance.

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These steps are a good overview of what is involved when designing a Section 508 accessible site:

Check your site online for compliance: You can use some reliable, online accessibility validation solutions that help you to identify errors in your web content related to WCAG guidelines or Section 508 standards. 

Know about different State policies: Different states in the US have different laws and policies that are applicable for web accessibility with respect to Section 508. 

Keep various disabilities in mind: You should design your web pages so that they benefit more than a few disability groups at a time. Consider the limitations of your intended users who may be operating in circumstances pretty different from yours, like:

* They may find it difficult to read or comprehend a text.

* They may have an impaired vision, audibility, movement, or may not have the ability to process specific types of information easily.

* Their browser may be of an early version or a different one from what the general web surfers use these days.

* They may have difficulty using a mouse or keyboard.

Make your images accessible: While some users have text-based browsers that offer no support for images, some others may have a slow Internet connection that has made them turn off support for images. There may be some users who are unable to see images. 


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